Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 385
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 344-351

Knowledge and attitudes toward HIV, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus infection among health-care workers in Malawi


1 Department of Nursing, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; College of Nursing, Daeyang University, Lilongwe, Malawi
2 General Medicine, Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe; General Medicine, College of Medicine, Blantyre, Malawi
3 College of Nursing, Daeyang University, Lilongwe, Malawi
4 Department of Nursing, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Correspondence Address:
Jasintha Mtengezo
Department of Nursing, University of Massachusetts Boston, MA, USA; Former Dean, College of Nursing, Daeyang University, Lilongwe, Malawi

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2347-5625.195921

Rights and Permissions

Objective: The highest prevalence of HIV infection occurs in Sub-Saharan Africa and hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence are the second highest in Sub-Saharan Africa including Malawi. Health-care workers (HCWs) play an important role in the prevention of, response to, and management of these infectious diseases. There is, however, no published research about the level of knowledge and attitudes toward HIV, HBV, and HCV infection among Malawian HCWs. The purpose of this study was to explore and determine the knowledge of and attitudes toward HIV, HBV, and HCV among a targeted population of Malawian HCWs. Methods: A cross-sectional community-based participatory research with 194 HCWs was completed employing health survey method. The project was a collaborative effort between nursing faculties in the USA and Malawian. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons was used to assess the differences in knowledge and attitude among three subgroups of HCWs. Results: Of 194 of Malawian HCWs surveyed, 41% were support staff, 37% were nursing students, and 22% were health-care professionals. Both health-care professionals and support staff had high knowledge scores related to HIV/AIDS, and their attitudes were mainly positive. However, a series of one-way ANOVAs revealed significant differences in knowledge and attitude toward HIV/AIDs, HBV, and HCV among HCWs (P < 0.01). The majority had less knowledge about HBV and HCV and more negative attitudes toward hepatitis. Conclusions: This study highlights the ongoing need for reducing negative attitudes toward HIV, HBV, and HCV; and providing health education among HCWs, especially focusing on HBV and HCV prevention. The findings of the research project can be used to develop interventions addressing low HBV- and HCV-related knowledge and attitudes.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed3026    
    Printed52    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded386    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 6    

Recommend this journal