Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 321
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 144-151

Treatment-related symptom severity and occurrences among oncology adults in Australia


1 Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore
2 School of Nursing, University of Kansas Medical Centre, KS, USA
3 Research Centre for Nursing and Midwifery Practice, Canberra, Australia

Correspondence Address:
Violeta Lopez
Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore
Singapore
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2347-5625.160973

Rights and Permissions

Objective: Cancer treatments cause a range of distressing symptoms that can be well managed with pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Treatment-related symptom screening and management by health care professionals is required to provide appropriate guidance to help patients to complete successfully their treatment regimen and achieve the best possible outcomes for patients. The aims of this study were to explore treatment-related symptom severity and occurrences among oncology adults in Australia and compare the results with the Chinese and Filipino studies. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive survey of 84 adult patients over 18 years of age undergoing chemotherapy (CT) and/or radiotherapy (RT) in the Radiation Oncology and Medical Oncology Departments in one public teaching hospital in Canberra, Australia using the 25-item treatment-related symptom checklist (TRSC) was used in this study. Results: Six symptom clusters emerged from combining the 25 symptoms. Patients receiving CT experienced highest fatigue symptom occurrences (95.8%) and greater symptom severity (mean = 2.59) for fatigue symptom cluster for patients receiving a combination of CT-RT. Australians treatment-related symptom severity and occurrences were higher compared with the Filipino and Chinese adult cancer patients. Conclusions: Nurses in oncology settings are uniquely placed to assess patients' therapy-related symptoms that will assist them to target education to cancer patients' individual needs. For all types of cancer, it is important to assess treatment-related symptoms and to provide the most appropriate interventions in consideration to the patients' preferences.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2608    
    Printed33    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded313    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal